CAREER HACK #46 – WHY GOOD INTENTIONS ARE BAD!

job search

I want to talk to you today about how good intentions are killing your job search. They’re killing you chances of getting back to work.

It’s Corey here, the “Career Hacker” and author of Find Your DRIVE (the new rules to finding your ideal job and living your best life) with another episode of the Career Hacker Blog.

I’ve been thinking about the quote, “The Road to Hell is paved with Good Intentions.” It’s been on my mind because I come across a lot of job search professionals that want to help BUT their help is actually limiting you and killing your chances of getting back to work.

Bad advice is killing your job search.

Let me explain with an example – it’s a little graphic but you’ll get the point.

You’re having a romantic dinner with your partner, you order dinner and a nice bottle or wine.

The food arrives and you start eating, when the person across the table – your date starts choking. I mean really choking!  They can’t breathe!  They start to panic and you start to panic.

You ask them, “Are you OK? Are you choking?”

The people around you notice what’s going on and they start to panic too!  

Someone, a complete stranger walk up and starts hitting your date/partner on the back to “help” them. 

Here’s what we know:

  1.  The person who is hitting your partner/spouse/date on the back has good intentions. They think they are helping.
  2.  Hitting someone on the back while they are choking dramatically increases the chance that they WILL DIE from choking! It’s not help – it’s dangerous!

They’re trying to help BUT… their actually increasing the chance of death! That’s not help!

The Heimlich maneuver is the way to save someone who’s choking.  You force the air up and out and push that blockage out of their throat using the air that’s in their lungs.

By hitting someone on the back you’re actually knocking the blockage further and further down their throat and completing the blockage leaving them unable to breathe at all.

This article isn’t about how to save someone who’s choking… but maybe it’ll help you down the road?

The point is “good intentions” don’t always help.  In fact they can hurt you.  They can be dangerous.  They can keep you from getting where you want to go.

When it comes to your job search there are a tonne of people with good intentions out there giving you advice… BUT they’re killing you.  They’re killing your job search and they’re killing your ability to get back to work.

Your Job Search is a strategic game.  Your Job Search isn’t about following the rules and being nice. It’s about being highly strategic and doing the thing that are going to get you hired.

So if you’re listening to people who are giving you job search advice you need to decide if their “help” is truly increasing your chances of a successful job search or if they’re slowly killing your chances and keeping you unemployed.  I don’t care how nice they are or how hard they’re working.  If you’ve been unemployed for more than 8 weeks, what they are doing isn’t working and it’s bad for your career search.

You should be getting no less than 25% call backs to every resume you send out!

The moral of the story is… STOP working with people who have good intentions but aren’t getting you results because they are hurting your job search.

START working with people who are highly strategic and have the statistics to back up the work they are doing.

That is the key to getting back to work and reclaiming your life.

It’s time to stop “fearing the mail box” because you can’t afford to pay another bill and being a provider for your family.

Don’t forget you can sign up for my FREE eBook and start changing the way you approach resume writing.

Sign Up Here ===> The 7 BIGGEST Resume Writing Mistakes Keeping You From Getting Interviews.”

“The people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world… usually do.” Apple Commercial from 1997…

==> BE HEARD! Let me know your Job Search Strategies by LEAVING A COMMENT below.

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